Student Case Competitions

Published by Jan Heaney on

Student Case Competitions


The general idea behind a case competition is that students are presented with a problem. A real-life situation that an organization or enterprise is currently experiencing or has experienced in the past. Students are provided information around those problems and they come up with a solution. The case competitions are really important for students. It doesn’t make any difference which case competition it is, and we participate currently in five. They all allow students to develop their analytical skills, their strategic planning skills but also it allows a student to work as a part of a team. So for the NAHSE case competition our project was to look at the DC, Maryland and Virginia area and help address the challenge that’s going on with our Medicare and Medicaid patients. So really hospitals right now are looking at how to save money, especially in looking at how our senior population will be so increased in the next 15 or 20 years and how we’ll be able to support that. We met for maybe 40 hours a week to just go over our strategy and highlight exactly what we were going to do as well as our presentation styles on how we were going to tackle the case. The solution we presented in our case was to create a care triad. A care triad is something that we use here at Rush and the medical home network along with the Medicaid population. We took that same idea and expanded it amongst the Medicare population where we would have a licensed social worker and a registered nurse along with a care coordinator. They did a very good job in terms of their delivery, but there are 31 other teams that they’re competing against. So it’s always the luck of the draw, when you were assigned to a room, But they did a superb job, they worked together well as a team, their delivery was excellent and I think that they really learned something about themselves as well as about a new subject matter. It was a great learning experience. We were able to hone in on our presentation strategies and skills and we were able to really develop our leadership qualities as well. Every day there were events that got us in line with top-level executives to make sure we can expand our network. So me and my classmates we actually had real job interviews while we were there. We actually met different executives while we were there to network. You’re sitting side-by-side with people in the executive suite, leaders that you wouldn’t come across on a regular day. It’s just so amazing to bring those people back down to a personable level and just be able to go and introduce yourself and say “Hi! I’m a part of this case competition and I know of your institution and I would love to learn more about it,” or even ask for advice. This is the opportunity for them to integrate all these very disparate ideas — quality, finance and leadership, and be able to defend it and present it in a way that’s coherent. It’s pretty cool.


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